Dong-Typography-Post1

Last night, on my way back home, I saw an empty bottle of liquor. It wasn’t Absolut Vodka. But when I think about liquor, Absolut Vodka always comes to my mind. Not that I like Absolut Vodka, their strong image from the bottle shaped my image to liquor that they are strong and powerful.

It’s been almost 25 years that Absolut vodka used this typography. They’d never changed their typography and almost brainwashed customers with their strong brand image. Using straight and bold lines, their message is very straightforward; Vodka is strong. Although they are using upper cases in all letters, I don’t think the bottle is yelling at me. Instead, sounds like a very good looking guy who has very low voice calling me and introducing himself very gently, and saying he is “IMPORTED”. And depends on the color of the letter, the voice changes.

 

Without using serifs on fonts, the meaning of “Absolute” becomes even stronger. Extra lines are not allowed to the Absolut Vodka. On the other hand, Vodka is not just strong but it is very high quality and upper class drink. Those thick and bold letters convey that not everyone can drink Absolut Vodka. It differentiate itself from other cheap drinks like Keystone beer.  With its fonts, this product guarantees its quality.

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One response to this post.

  1. Posted by ccjacquez on February 2, 2011 at 11:22 PM

    I would definitely agree that the use of a bold typeface without serifs makes the brand seem strong and conveys the idea that is of high quality. I think the bold and capital letters also emphasize the brand, and help it get distinguished from other brands. To me, it kind of says “I’m Here!” when I see the bottle. For some reason though I get the idea that is only supposed to be geared toward men or serious drinkers. Other drinks have script typefaces with thinner letters, that usually pertain to a female audience. Although the rest of the bottle has script writing, it is the actual logo itself that remains bold no matter what.

    Reply

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